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20120926
20121004
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at bob macdonald and virginia, not the national candid, but he is someone who clearly was socially conservative. telegraph that clearly to his voters. so he was able to actually go after suburban voters, what have you. because he thought of him as reliable and safe he was able to find things differently and very effectively, so i tend to think that is the better model than someone who explicitly says, hey, compare huntsman, for example, to george w. bush. >> and arubia would be someone. i can imagine jeb bush as being the intellectual leader, but not running himself. it attracted steel and who was not entirely in that can't get a little further in his direction. i can imagine the scenario. >> far be it for me to predict what the republicans are going to do. at that there are going to pass immigration reform in the mid 2000's. >> you weren't alone. >> i think jeb bush is going to reposition himself. he went to tampa and said, were acting stupid and immigration. writing a book and immigration reform that will be less next year. i think he is positioning himself to be the guy who is c
of the four but it did it cover in budget watchers. bob greenstein is on the senate priorities and that of president obama's transition team policy work. douglas holtz-eakin is president of the american action forum and headed the domestic policy staff in the campaign ad was the director of the congressional budget office. donald marron is the director of the tax policy center and member of george bush's advisor and acting director of cbo and finally, digamma rogers blogs as an economist and was the chief economist of the house budget committee for the democratic staff of the house ways and means committee. the format today will be relatively straightforward. each of the panelists will speak for five minutes. i will ask some questions and we will get a discussion going up here and then turn to the audience to give you all a chance to ask questions. we have people watching on c-span and on the web. if you are not in the room and have questions, please send them to publicaffairs@urban.org and the questions will come to me. let's start. >> thanks everybody for being here and for b
. next to him is our own jessica matthews of the carnegie endowment, and beside jessica is bob kagan at the brookings institution and we are going to cover several sets of issues in metal blocks tonight. in each case i'm going to open up. i'm going to open the discussion with a quote from one or two of the panelists. we will then have some interaction. among the panelists and then i will ask them a couple of questions about related issues. following that at end of each one of these 320 or 25 minute sections i am going to look to you for questions so we can keep this as interactive as possible and have you as engaged in the discussion as possible. at the very end there will even be a little more time so that if we haven't covered something in the context of these three themes, then you will be able to introduce them into the discussion and we will wrap up promptly at 8:00 tonight. when we do get to the questions and answers a would be good if you would identify yourself and keep your statement in the form of a question rather than a narration. i've already spoken to them about the sam
that's between democrat bob kerrey and republican derek fisher. an open seat in nebraska created by the retirement of democratic senator ben nelson. we'll have that for you live at noon eastern on c-span, courtesy of key etd in omaha, nebraska. also will have remarks from the president of yemen on the future of this country in light of security problems and hunger crisis. we will have those comments live for you at went eastern on c-span. tonight more campaign 2012 coverage. a life wisconsin senator they. congresswoman tammy baldwin debating former health secretary tom he comes in who is a republican. the debate is hosted by the wisconsin broadcasters association. it is courtesy of tv in milwaukee. we will have a live for you at 9:00 eastern on c-span. >> [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> a. >> [inaudible conversations] >> this cybersecurity summit is about to get underway. i reminder, i misspoke, it is democratic senator herb kohl retiring in wisconsin. that live debate will be at 9:00 eastern on c-span. this event is scheduled t
-- look at a bob mcdonnell in virginia. he is someone who clearly was socially conservative, telegraph that very clear to his voters and the thought of him as reliable, and so he was able to go after suburban voters and what have you. but because you thought of him as reliable and say, he was able to frame things effectively. i think that's a better model. compare a huntsman to george w. bush. >> and marco rubio. i can imagine jeb bush is being the intellectual leader, but not running himself, maybe trying to see a rubio was not message of anti-and i can't get but further in this direction. i can sort of imagine that scenario. >> far be it for me to predict what republicans are going to do. i thought they're going to pass immigration reform in 2000, but i think jeb bush is going, he's positioning himself. he went to tampa and said we are acting stupid on immigration. is going to write a book and immigration reform. i think he's positioning himself to be the guy who is very conservative, catholic, he's got a great education track record but i think is going to be well-positioned to be,
. doctor bob holdsworth is the founder and president of virginia tomorrow, a company that examines emerging trends in politics, society, and business. his observations on national politics have appeared in "the wall street journal", "washington post", "new york times", most of the u.s. broadcasting stations, itn and bbc and fuji in japan. he has served on a number of commissions and advisory boards and was the costaff director of the commission on the future of virginia's urban area. on the charter commission for the city of richmond. he also was a founding director of the center for public policy and the wilder school of government and public affairs of the virginia commonwealth university. i think each of you for coming tonight, and i which each of the candidates a good debate. now, i will turn to our moderator. [applause] >> thank you very much, what a great audience we have tonight, we are going to have a wonderful debate. let me begin with a few reminders for everyone. first, we are fortunate enough to have c-span covering this event tonight and we want to let everyone know about that
, and bob schiffer the cbs correspondent and a host of face the nation. tomorrow night they are hosting -- there are other stories in the people looking at the candidates and to do. "the chicago tribune" says the gop may hinge on the debate in showdown could be pivotal for romney on president obama's edge. the race enters its final phase of the distinct president obama and 3g dates as the republican mitt romney's best and last chance to reverse the space trend. florent joins in michigan. democratic collar. are you going to a man tomorrow night, and why? lawrence, are you with us? oats want to bill in its water and independent collar. hello, bill. good morning. are you going to be watching tomorrow? >> caller: good morning. absolutely. i was brought up in a republican house told, but i've been paying attention to the debates and have seen a lot of shows about the issues are coming and i just don't have the confidence after the republican convention that they have a plan because they have been avoiding giving any specifics so i want to hear the republicans have something to say. other tha
administration will look like in 2013. that it may would normally be the case if a bob dole or jon mccain or bill clinton, these are people of been in office a long time either innocent or governorship, i think one had a sense of how their strengths and weaknesses. i'm not sure either case you that we now. and the question is i suppose the campaign, what have we learned from the campaigns. i'll think about that for a minute and let bart -- i think it is an interesting question in this case. >> it is a good one but there's no obvious, there is no obvious thing that leaps out that you can save look at the way romney has run the campaign, therefore he will be this kind of president. and i think enron mike lee, and maybe an obama's, too, there's a pretty sharp -- campaigning you have to go through to get elected. it's not a place unfortunate i think he really make serious arguments and really educate the public. as ron himself is said, very revealing, my test is to get 51% of the vote. of course, they will think that. it's a funny thing for a candidate to say, but that's what he thinks about campaign
the right to ask you to follow it. and then a great case bob jones university a tax-exempt status as a university denied by a the irs because bob jones university wouldn't allow african-americans and to its campus or african-americans changed that and wouldn't let them date anybody but african-americans, and they said that as our religious beliefs and we shouldn't be denied tax exemption because of our religious beliefs. the government shouldn't be allowed to have that power over us and the supreme court said too bad, you lose. the government can devalue tax-exempt status. even though it does involve your religious beliefs because there are some rules for the civil society and secular society, and we are founded on the principle that we get to have an organized non-chaotic government even if it does infringe on the religious belief that as long as we are not hurting the religion. so saying all of that i think a lot of what is going on with this birth control argument and with the compromise of the churches are wanting from the government have constitutional implications, and with
to another. i, unfortunatelily, have to leave to meet bob kissinger who is arriving to the wilson center, but will from npr will take over for me. dan, over to you. >> well, thank you. i'd like to thank the woodrow wilson center and asian research as well as ashley, himself, who is certainly driving the process intellectually and a role model in bringing strategic studies and deep knowledge of asia together, which i think is part of what we are trying to do here. i thank laura, who is in the audience, not just a research assistant, but almost a partner in the endeavor. we think the chinese are nontransparent about defense spending, and they are. try looking at u.s. defense budgets and going through the various presidential statements, omb statements, naval shipbuilding staples, and we may be too transparent. certainly confused us. we tried to bring logic to it in the end as was our task. i'd like to go through five points, if i might. the first, i think, has to do with -- i'm putting the cards on the table, a traditionalist in strategic matters in the sense that political goals drive str
decided to agree with bob dole about providing an exemption from capital gains tax if you owned your house for i believe it was three years. and as result you area of agreement in the debates. if you said i've got my house on the market, should take it down immediately and wait for the next congress. in the next congress, clinton was president. republicans were in power. they passed that exemption. the area of agreement mattered in a forecast governance. we had areas of agreement can not a discussion about things that will be consequential. witnessed the agreement afghanistan was a good war in the last election. so try to raise the level of agassi can affect partisan but it doesn't affect partisan votes. anymore questions? if not we're going to thank the panel. [applause] >> and we're going to play our grammar for fact-checking online why you get lunch and we'll come back to panel three. this last panel is cosponsored by cgi. thanks to them. please go get some lunch and we will see you in 10 minutes. >> [inaudible conversations] >> a short break in this conference on the role of the press
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11